20
Jun

Beware of Accidents at Your Edges


 

Last night I was out running in a county park near my house.  I was running on a path through the woods that is very hilly.  As I approached the crest of a very steep and muddy hill on the path there were two mountain bikers screaming downhill and just missed me by inches.

I was wearing a high-visibility fluorescent green running shirt.  It is one reason why I did not have an “accident.”  The mountain bikers were startled by a 6’3″ fluorescent green blob running uphill.   If the mountain bikers did not swerve to avoid me, there would have been a major impact.  In the position I was in at the top of the hill, there was just no way I could have moved to avoid being seriously hurt.

My friend,  best selling author, Colette Baron-Reid, recently had an “accident” on her motorcycle.  She wrote about it in a recent blog posting.  She writes “Have you ever experienced an ‘accident’ that resulted in the mirror of your life being put two inches from your face with no escape until you took a real hard look at what was reflected back?”

What does the edge of your mirror look like?  What would you see in that reflection?

An “accident” is defined as “an unfortunate incident that happens unexpectedly and unintentionally, typically resulting in damage or injury.”

“Accidents” frequently occur when we stay too long at one of our edges.  Edges are places of change.  Edges are places of transformation.  Accidents frequently happen when we are not listening and acting on the information we receive.  Our own intuitive hits, our own inner knowing.

“Accidents” force us to stop what we are doing.  They break us out of the patterns we repeat over and over.  Many speculate, “accidents” are not really “accidents” at all.  But instead are synchronous events designed to get our attention if we stay too long at an edge on our soul plan.  Soul growth events that may include many gifts.

I got my message.  I have been spreading myself too thin personally and professionally.  Time to re-balance and re-focus.  Before I have a real “accident” and am forced to take a break.

Out There on the Edge of Everything…

Stephen Lesavich, PhD